Sales And Marketing Jobs In The UK

The general job market in the United Kingdom is benefiting greatly from the influx of new talent. University graduation rates are increasing annually, which means companies of all sizes are gaining benefits from talented young professionals. As well, the Internet and the decreased barriers between countries means that international workers are often seeking work in the United Kingdom. The professional fields that benefits from these developments are sales and marketing. The reason why sales and marketing departments are getting the best of increased talent is that graduates, by and large, choose these fields to work in. Both sales and marketing requires creativity, intelligence, and business acumen. There are several corporate sectors which interested graduates should search for a sales and marketing job in the UK.

One of the hottest fields for sales and marketing professionals in the UK at present is in telecommunications. We have all seen advertisements, in print or on television, which are creative and extol the virtues of cell phones and data plans. Sales and marketing professionals with telecommunications firms work on creative and effective advertising to keep them above and beyond the competition. This area of sales and marketing is particularly competitive, so creative minds need to be coupled with an ability to develop concepts that will separate their products from the competition.

Sales and marketing professionals looking for work in the UK should also consider the automotive industry. Automotive firms in the UK are always looking for people to promote and sell their latest line of products. Sales professionals can range from show room sales people, who work directly with customers, to fleet sales managers, who help governments and large corporations purchase mass quantities of automobiles. Marketing professionals typically review the tag line and past advertising campaigns of their firm and try to bring these older concepts into a new generation. These jobs are tough to come by for young professionals but training programs and recruiting firms can open up auto firm doors to exceptional candidates.

Finally, sales and marketing professionals need to consider the engineering industry as a good outlet for their skills. While the engineering field may be understated in its advertising to the public, young professionals can find great work with firms big and small. Sales people work with potential clients, including government bodies and large corporations, in order to sell engineering services. Marketing professionals work with graphic designers and advertisers to find outlets for their firm’s name and logo. These professionals often work on publications and website materials, as there are few commercials for engineering services.

Boring Impersonal Ineffective CRM or Perfect Automated Sales and Marketing Tool?

How can a business with a sales staff turn their CRM system into a sales tool? The answer depends greatly on the system a company uses and the resources it has or is willing to have to make this happen.

Why would a company want to have this boring data be perceived as or used as a sales tool? The answer has more to do with psychology than process. The very nature and make-up of a sales person is such that they won’t use it fully, completely or honestly unless it actually aids in the sales process. In addition most sales people see a CRM system as a way for the company to capture their leads and track their effectiveness, and the majority of sales people don’t like that! This persona and angle gives them their edge.

Or does it?

Turning this into a tool that helps them make sales and be more effective and efficient is not just in the training and pushing of policy. It is also having a system that actually enhances, enables and drives the sales and marketing process while not being a mundane task or cold vehicle.

Pardon me while we get boring for a moment and review the basics of what a CRM is and thus isn’t. The aim of using a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system is to enable storage of readily available records, to enable such records to be kept in such a way that analysis of the relationship between each record can be enabled, that such knowledge about the customers and prospective clients within an organizations purview can be enhanced. This is typically done using the database feature, mining such data both internally and externally and applying common business intelligence and reporting systems.

In most CRM systems the knowledge a company has regarding a customer at the very least, which is stored in the database, are the basics. This includes but is not limited to their name, who they work for, what department they work in, along with all known forms of direct or indirect contact. Some systems are more complex and take the database fields, along with the activity logged in association with the fields, to come up with client profitability, transactional behavior, e-mail opens and clicks-to-links, call center or sales force contact and communication logs, customer satisfaction and retention ratios, and manual entry of the success or failure of legacy mailings and marketing campaigns.

Capturing the information from the processes (sales, marketing, installation, credit extensions, etc.) and from the various marketing channels (phone, personal interaction, web site) is not only mechanical, technical and part of the company systems, but more importantly, part of the big picture. It is this big picture that must be instilled within those who will be performing the mundane task along with benefiting from it financially and organizationally. A great system allows complete access to what the sales and marketing members need for tools to do what drives the company. Access and process training avoids duplicate client data and multiple versions of the truth.

As has been written on our blog and publicly published, the perfect sales and marketing business model is within the reach of even the smallest business today. These systems, incased within today’s CRM’s on steroids, will:

  • Optimize marketing effectiveness
  • Attract prospective customers
  • Enable automated cross-selling and upselling
  • Aid in retention of clients and quality engaged employees who both are company advocates
  • Enhance the analysis of client behavior to aid in the product decision making and development process while furthering the drive to utopia with regards to quality and profitability targets.
  • Make way for tags, targets, groups and associations which enable the sales force to concentrate on identifying key prospective customers that cut their transaction time and increase their relationship building time.
  • Allow for the near prediction of customer defection and identification of those team members who contribute most to what the stakeholders seek.
  • Most importantly, the best systems automate the marketing process based upon behavior and choices and nearly eliminate the prospect falling out of the pipeline follow-up.

There are many businesses today that have a CRM system and some even have the best of the best. But the select few have put to use the one that changes the game, that levels the playing field, that can enable David to take on Goliath and that give their sales team a real too they trust and use because it helps them make sales and obtain & then retain loyal customers.

While the system is about data it must be about being a difference maker in the eyes of the users. The users must be able to visualize the results, understand their role, believe in its impact and trust that they will gain from having made this tool work for the betterment of all.

The perfect system does exist, and while they can be complicated, they are capable of performing the following tasks almost automatically when combined with your current web site and marketing efforts:

  • Attract web traffic and prospective customers via webinars, white papers, blogs, testimonial publications, social media and SEO enhancement. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Capture information and data by clicks, hits, visits, web forms, opt-ins, recorded conversations, electronic business cards, e-magnets and pod casts. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Nurture the reluctant prospect by educating and building a relationship through e-zines, blogs, caring personal conversation starters and an email series once a defined area of interest is established. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Convert leads and prospects into customers. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Deliver products and services, while automatically billing, collecting, renewing subscriptions and informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Add-on, upsell and cross-sell. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.
  • Refer and collaborate with vendors and like businesses. Obtain and publish references and testimonials. Then informing sales and marketing of the results.

Your business must generate excitement, spontaneous enthusiasm, buzz and traffic. Your business must know how to capture leads with systems, how to consistently follow up with those leads, and how to turn them into advocates by creating an experience surrounding their purchase. Your business must have a sales team that knows this system will only enhance their performance through increased opportunities and conversion of leads to customers.

Presentation Warriors: Sales and Marketing Executives Versus 12-Year-Olds

Who delivers a better presentation and why?

Recently I listened to a group of senior sales and marketing executives speak at a networking meeting. I also served as a judge at a speech contest for 12-year-olds. These two unrelated events prompted me to compare the presentation skills of each group.

1. Guess who was more engaging, attention grabbing and memorable?

2. Guess who was boring, uninspiring and easily forgettable?

The answer to question one is – the 12-year-olds. They were good.

The answer to question two is – the sales & marketing executives. They needed improvement.

Why did 12-year-olds deliver better presentations than senior sales and marketing executives?

Competition The 12-year olds were competing in a speech contest. Many of their parents were there. Money and prestige were on the line, so they were well rehearsed.

Focus Each presenter had a focused message. Their presentation was designed to deliver that message. Some were deep and serious while others were light and whimsical. In all cases the message was clear and easy to summarize.

Relate The presenters spoke to the interests of the audience. The topics ranged from “the influence of the media”, “tourism in third world countries”, “the family van”, “peculiarities of the English language”, and “homework”. Yet each speaker related the topic to the listener.

Stories Each speaker told colorful stories. That sparked images in my mind. Many said things that were funny and made me laugh. Some statements challenged my opinion. I was impressed by the carefully selected words and phrasing. All were simple and understandable.

Passion Each speaker conveyed passion for their message. Each radiated that they were happy to be speaking to us.

Bold These speakers were bold. They stood before the audience, looked people in the eye, delivered their statements and performed.

What did the Sales & Marketing Executives (SME) do poorly?

Winging it The SME seemed to be winging it – even though they were competing for attention, memorability and jobs. These SME were between jobs but seemed reluctant to compete and rehearse. Yet, clearly a lot of money was on the line. If their family had attended, would they have prepared better?

Vague There was no focus or purpose evident. It almost seemed that they first were reciting their resume and then what they had for breakfast. Okay, I’m exaggerating the breakfast part – but it seemed as boring as porridge.

Pain Each speaker seemed to be caught in their own self-centered world. Most didn’t relate to me or how they might fix my pain or that of my contacts. How could I help them if I didn’t know what they were offering? Stating “who you worked for” tells me little. They needed to speak of pain and solutions.

Blah Facts, history and blah, blah, blah. Some related recent experiences but none that were worth remembering. Many used filler, self-sabotaging and jargon words. I was bored, confused and unimpressed.

Passion? I didn’t feel it. The emotion that I felt was remorse. “Why am I here?”

Timid You might think that Sales & Marketing Executives would be anything but humble. You might think that Sales & Marketing Executives would grasp the difference between benefits and features. I thought so too.

All of the SME sat while speaking, crunched in their chairs some with an arm draped over the back of the chair. It was as if this was a family picnic instead of a possible career defining meeting. I found it curious that none of the men wore a tie. Did they want to be taken seriously? Or was this just a social club?

Presentation Skills Contest Results What’s the score? 12-year olds -1. Sales & Marketing Executives – 0.

Some of you might think that I’m too hard on the Sales & Marketing Executives. That I’m expecting too much from them. Maybe – but I bet that I’m not the only one.